Board of Directors, 2019-20

davidvalonePresident
David Valone (David.Valone@quinnipiac.edu)

David Valone is Professor of History at Quinnipiac University. His research interests include the economic and ideological underpinnings of Ireland’s Great Famine and the history of reproductive technologies. He is the editor or co-editor of a number of books, including Ireland’s Great Hunger (2002) and Anglo-Irish Identities, 1571-1845 (2008).

 

Immediate Past President
Position vacant.

 

Vice President
Richard Fogarty (rfogarty@albany.edu)

Richard Fogarty is Associate Professor of History at the University at Albany, SUNY. He is the author of Race and War in France: Colonial Subjects in the French Army, 1914-1918 (2008), and co-editor of Empires in World War I: Shifting Frontiers and Imperial Dynamics in a Global Conflict (2014).

 

juliegibertSecretary
Julie Gibert (gibert@canisius.edu)

Julie Gibert is Associate Professor of History at Canisius College. Her research focuses on late 19th- and 20th-century British social history; she has published and presented papers on a variety of topics including women’s education, the changing role of domestic service in British home life, and the depiction of British society in film and television.

 

blanchfield_lyn_resizeTreasurer
Lyn Blanchfield (lyn.blanchfield@oswego.edu)

Lyn Blanchfield is Visiting Assistant Professor of History at SUNY Oswego. Her research focuses on medieval and early modern women and gender issues, particularly the history of emotions.

 

Executive Board

averillearlsAverill Earls (aearls@mercyhurst.edu)

Averill Earls is Assistant Professor of History at Mercyhurst University. Her research focuses on ideas about and the policing of same-sex desire and masculinity in modern Ireland. She is the Executive Producer at Dig: A History Podcast, and is currently at work on her first book, Love in the Lav: Policing Same-Sex Desire in 20th Century Ireland.

 

Gokcek-Mustafa-bMustafa Gökçek (gokcek@niagara.edu)

Mustafa Gökçek is Associate Professor of History and Director of Interdisciplinary Studies at Niagara University. His research focuses on the discourses of nationalism and Islamism at the turn of the 20th century in the Ottoman Empire. He is especially interested in the intellectual interaction between Russian and Ottoman Empires and looks into the role of the Kazan Tatar emigres in Istanbul in the development of Turkish nationalism and secularization of the Ottoman governance.

 

sealeYvonne Seale (seale@geneseo.edu)

Yvonne Seale is Assistant Professor of History at SUNY Geneseo. Her research focuses on the history of women and the social history of religion in France during the High Middle Ages, and is currently working on a book on the history of women’s involvement with the Premonstratensian religious order.

 

Jennifer_SovdeJennifer Sovde (sovdej@canton.edu)

Jennifer Sovde is Assistant Professor of History at SUNY Canton. She is a historian of modern Europe, and her research focuses on the intersection of child labor laws and the entertainment industry in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century France.

 

Michael Guzik (guzikma@lemoyne.edu)

Michael Guzik, S.J., is an Assistant Professor of History at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, NY.  His research focuses on the conduct of the Pontifical Commission for Russia under the leadership of its first president, the Jesuit Michel d’Herbigny, from its origins to 1933.

Brian Newsome (newsomewb@etown.edu)

Brian Newsome is Professor of History and Dean for Curriculum and Honors at Elizabethtown College, Pennsylvania. He is the author of French Urban Planning, 1940-1968: The Construction and Deconstruction of an Authoritarian System (2009) and has translated Maxence van der Meersch’s war novel, Invasion 14.

 

Andrew Tompkins (atompkins02@manhattan.edu)

Andrew Tompkins is Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Manhattan College in New York City. His research focuses on the implications of technocratic political policymaking in mid-twentieth-century France. He has written and presented on an array of topics, from European and American utopian socialist projects of the nineteenth century to the dissemination of pseudoscientific concepts via the use of popular nineteenth-century British periodicals.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s